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  Topic: Is this the future of amateur radio? (9 replies)
#1     Sat Oct 28, 2006 3:33 am
M0GVQ
Tetbury, Glos
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 2
Subject: Is this the future of amateur radio?

Qsonet have achieved something special with this programme. It therefore begs the question, is this the future of amateur radio as we know it? Obviously antenna's and radio stations using the real ionosphere will always be the main method of amateur transmissions...or will they?

It'll be interesting to find out.

73's

Andy Sibley-M0GVQ
UK
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#2     Sat Oct 28, 2006 10:34 am
N9VV
Naperville, IL USA
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 20
Subject: Internet Radio == future of ham radio?

Hi Andy, thank you for posting this interesting question.

I can imagine many reasons that the Internet concept will be extremely popular:
    Hams who can not erect an Antenna and are in non-ham friendsly sites.
    Hams who enjoy the fantastic "Ionospheric condx" on the Internet.
    The novelty of this mode.
    Hams who will wait for the next Solar Max to get on the air.
    CQ100 is fun.
    Real ham radio requires an ever increased investment $$
    CQ100 is great for the old-timers and aging ham population.


However, there are also several detractors:
    The current requirement for a picture of your license effectively discriminates against the VERY POPULATION OF YOUNG persons who we desperately need to carry our hobby forward. CQ100 could be the incubator where youngsters learn all about Ham Radio and go on to get their licenses. The author has shut the door on that wonderful opportunity.

    The current requirement for a picture of your license places Doug in the position of being the policeman for his bands. Ham Radio has a stunning 50+ year history of volunteer Official Observers who make us "self policing". Alternatively, Doug could appoint OOs and have them monitor the QsoNet bands for "boot leggers" and unacceptable behavior. However, after people PAY for QsoNet service, how would their privileges be legally removed and revoked?

    A manufacturer of Ham radio equipment told me that Hams are the cheapest bunch of customers in the world. Will hams actually PAY for QsoNet service? or just try it for a few days and abandon it? Can the current QsoNet "business model" actually succeed? QsoNet costs more than a magazine subscription ;-)

    Perhaps the owner could consider how the Web has evolved into a successful advertising medium. He can offer CQ100 free of charge with advertising? and offer it without the annoying advertising for those Hams who wish to subscribe? He could be making a $$zillon with that concept :-)

    The current implementation of CQ100 is closed and proprietary. I imagine the author could dramatically expand the use of this technology by making it opensource, using a portable language such as Erlang, and providing a robust and well engineered API so various new features can be added.


thanks again Andy for this opportunity to respond,
73s de ken n9vv
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#3     Sat Oct 28, 2006 6:10 pm
M0GVQ
Tetbury, Glos
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 2
Subject: Join the discussion

Thank you Ken you do indeed raise some interesting points. This is the point of the poll, to get people talking about it. All opinions are welcomed!!

I am currently trying to drum up some interest in cq100 within the club and the community I belong to in the town of Swindon in the UK. I invite you all to join the discussion on the forum and add your opinions and views. It will help drum up further interest and get more people interested in qsonet.

If you access my details through QRZ.com you will be able to go to my web page. From there, follow the link to the Swindon Radio Club. You will be able to access the forum link from there. If you find my article entitled " software radio" please join the discussion from there.

The forum is read by many people in the west country and I would dearly love cq100 to grow within the amateur community.

Many thanks and I hope to see you all on the forum!

73's

Andy - M0GVQ
UK
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#4     Mon Nov 13, 2006 10:53 am
M1NTO
MANCHESTER
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 5
Subject: CHARGING FOR USE OF CQ100

At the outset, one can see the argument for a free service but we must remember that expense in set up costs, without advertising revenue, might prohibit the supplier.

Our Licence Fee of 15 will disappear in December and this service, free of interference, no 'over keying', no QRM, QRM OR QSB is cheap at the price. Don't get the idea that I am against the normal RF system of communication, far from it, but as others point out, those in accommodation that cannot have aerials and many other groups now have a mode of operation far superior in many ways.

Radio suppliers might wince at downward sales trends but hey, there must be a need for VHF & UHF sets.

I have no qualms about our need to produce a current Licence. When did you last hear a 'pirate' on the air; an unlicenced individual 'keying up' and blocking frequencies or other fool hell bent on making a nuisance?

We carry a Driving Licence when operating a motor vehicle so let's not hear any more about 'policemen', please.

Good luck to Doulas for his spirit of adventure - on a sure thing!
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#5     Mon Nov 13, 2006 1:59 pm
W0SDG
Apple Valley MN
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 101
Subject:

This response has been rethunked! New posting below.
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#6     Mon Nov 13, 2006 3:03 pm
W7RJR
Spokane, WA
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 114
Subject: Re: Is this the future of amateur radio?


M0GVQ wrote:
It therefore begs the question, is this the future of amateur radio as we know it?


With all due respect, I hope not!

Iphone, Echolink and IRLP have been around for a while. To date, the vast majority of hams have not abandoned their radios for these services. CQ100 is unique in that it offers the flavor and environment of HF radio. I think it provides a gratifying service to those who are unable to put a station on-the-air. I never lose sight of the fact that it is an internet simulation and nothing more.

Please, no official observers, policemen, SWLs or excessive rules and regulations! Last I looked this is the internet.
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#7     Mon Nov 13, 2006 4:50 pm
VE3EFC
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 724
Subject:

I turned on my Kenwood last Saturday morning and worked a UK station on 20 meter CW. We exchanged 449 reports. I was surprised when I filled out my log that its been 6 weeks since my last contact on "real radio".

When I started using the internet ten years ago, I found that every hour I spent on the internet was an hour less spent watching TV. There are only so many hours in a day.

Now I find that every hour I spend on QsoNet is an hour less spent on real radio. I am planning to redesign my shack so I can run the real and virtual radio side by side. The computer equipment makes a lot of birdies on the Kenwood :(

73 Doug
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#8     Mon Nov 20, 2006 11:47 pm
N3CKF
Belmont, CA
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 1
Subject: Does CQ100 need an 11 Meter band?

I'm wondering - could a version fo the transceiver be created that had only transmit priveleges on a "free" band (like the old CB band does on real HF), and listen privs on all the other bands? (like a "general coverage" receiver)?

That might get a lot more people interested, including kids, etc.

Personally i think CQ100 is *great*, and its a real innovation - bringing "radio" look and feel to VoiceOverIP networking. Very innovative.

Joe Pistritto
N3CKF
Silicon Valley, California
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#9     Tue Nov 21, 2006 6:17 am
G0KIZ
Manchester UK
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 2
Subject: Your Poll

Reading your poll question,s they are one sided not giving a Fair chance to any participant to voice a true opinion. But instead reinforce an Opinion that has already been formed,
Regards Larry
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#10     Tue Nov 21, 2006 8:48 am
W0SDG
Apple Valley MN
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 101
Subject:

Nicely presented Larry, you are absolutely correct. The Poll simply asked a question about how the internet will affect the growth of Ham Radio and not the performance possiblities and objectives of CQ100. The question presented us also is relative to the other hamsites out there that are set up for the use of hams, echolink, etc, no more, no less. So my response to the Poll is that I am hopeful that programs and sites of this type will not be the demise of Ham Radio, but rather, used as a sideline, especially for those that have had to rely on other methods other then true RF. I know that this mode has decreased my HF activity, but has not replaced it. If I think about it, the real challenge of Ham Radio, for me, is the "chase", going for that weak signal, or Awards and verification of contacts, experimenting with antennas, and maybe even eventually understanding how it all works, improving my CW speed, going to Hamfests and finding a treasure, and all sorts of little goals it presents to us. My bottom line thinking is that the internet options are great, and it may reduce the numbers out there, at least for awhile, but hopeful that this will only be a part of my "HamShack", and not my only method of communication.

I am removing my previous post (if I can) because it really is not relevant to the original question of the Poll. Thanks for setting me straight Larry.

Steve - W0SDG
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