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  Topic: Where is the VOIP injected into the HF bands? (2 replies)
#1     Mon Dec 21, 2009 9:22 am
KS4VB
St. Petersburg, FL
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 2
Subject: Where is the VOIP injected into the HF bands?

I am an absolute newbie to VOIP and CQ100.

I just listened to the Waterway Radio and Cruising Club on 7.268 at 0745 Eastern and it was exactly as I hear on my hf rig; some stations 10 over, some down in the mud. I think I understand VOIP, but somewhere, there is a computer (server) linked to an hf rig that is connected to an antenna, and ...well. you know how all that works. And anyone transmitting on CQ100 was 30 over!

So my question is, where is the antenna. And what is my "QTH", virtually speaking.

Thanks.
Charlie
KS4VB
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#2     Mon Dec 21, 2009 3:38 pm
NJ3H
Stephens City, Virginia, USA
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 57
Subject:

Charlie,

Except for some CQ100 linking to HF (of which I haven't come across any yet), what you hear on CQ100 is NOT being broadcast on the HF bands. You are "transmitting" and "receiving" on a server or servers in a manner to simulate the real amateur radio bands. That is why, you can transmit on frequencies that are outside of your license class. You aren't on the radio - you are just chatting (and other modes of communication) on the computer with software that simulates actual amateur communications.

Contacts made do not count for WAS, DXCC, etc as awarded by the ARRL. There may be some similar awards for CQ100, but I do not know.

So, you may ask, if it isn't real amateur radio, then why bother? For me, without HF capability (antenna restrictions) I can easily talk to people around the world. Of course I could do that on Skype or some other system, but on CQ100 you are talking to fellow hams. For those that are in senior living conditions, on the road with wi-fi, or whatever, this is a fun way to stay in touch with others.

CQ100 costs $32 a year, something like a dime a day. It is far cheaper than just going to Radio Shack and buying a couple of cables. If your desire is to augment your communications capabily and to augment your ham fun, then this is a fun place to be.

I hope this explanation helps.

Regards,
George
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#3     Tue Dec 22, 2009 12:35 am
KS4VB
St. Petersburg, FL
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 2
Subject:

George-
Thanks for the explanation, that is generally how I thought it worked. I remember using VOIP protocol five years ago to talk to a contact in Australia using a 2 M repeater in his vicinity.

That all being said; I listened to the WWRCC directed net at 0745 Eastern on 7.268 MHz and it was real hf radio with check-ins up and down the Eastern seaboard, the Bahamas, the Keys, etc. with fading signals and good signals...real, live, hf radio. Net control on 12/22 is going to be using CQ100 and he is going to be talking to hams on boats.

So my question still stands, slightly reformatted; where is the signal bridged from the internet into the real ionosphere and what is the QTH of the antenna?

73-
Charlie
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